Driver training: Why it's better to outsource

18 August 2019 | Motors

Many companies choose to outsource certain functions because of the cost-savings associated with this.

There is, however, strategic benefits as well. This includes access to more skilled expertise and improved efficiency. One reason that most of this is possible is because business owners are free to focus on their core business.

One area proving to be strategically beneficial to businesses, is the outsourcing of driver training. The managing director of MasterDrive, Eugene Herbert, explains: “It is just not possible to be a Jack of all trades and then master all of these trades. As soon as you divert your attention from the functions responsible for your business' existence, your ability to deliver your product or service can only be impacted. Yet, in the same way that you can't afford to take your attention away from your bottom line, you cannot neglect training your fleets. There are monetary and ethical implications. Outsourcing driver training allows this part of your operations to be given the highest priority while you focus on your core business.”

Additionally, there are numerous advantages to outsourcing driver training. “Trainers are highly skilled, participating in 'train the trainer' exercises and continual updates to align training with best practice. Outsourcing training removes the need to upskill internal employees. Furthermore, this extensive training not only improves your drivers' safety on the road but increases efficiencies through more economical driving.

“It also means you have a solid plan in place to manage one of the biggest risks to a company fleet, with little effort required from your business. A well-trained fleet also allows you to improve the service you deliver. Crashes, even minor ones, result in delays for your clients. Neglecting to train your drivers because you do not want to divert your attention away from your core, can be a mistake.”

Often companies select their best drivers as their internal training instructors. “This creates a number of challenges. While that driver may have excellent driving skills, it does not mean they will be a good instructor. Promoting a driver to this position also affects their relationship with other drivers. Allegations of favouritism or discrimination are often made when a fellow driver makes these assessments,” says Herbert.

When it comes to the different roles you have to assume in your business, it can be easy to become Jack of all trades but master of none. Outsour­cing driver training has many more benefits than just cost-savings. 

– Motorpress