Wildlife losses studied

Human-predator conflict with carnivores in Namibia’s eastern communal conservancies

07 May 2020 | Environment

Farmers in Namibia’s eastern communal conservancies lose an average 8% of their livestock to predators a year – equal to an annual estimated cost of U$2 848 (more than N$53 000) per farmer.
This calculation is based on a comprehensive assessment of conflict with farmers in that area that was carried out by the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) as part of a long-term integrative management plan.
The CCF says that this amount is high compared to other areas across sub-Saharan Africa and highlights the severity of the human-wildlife conflict.
The CCF study, “Assessing human conflicts with carnivores in Namibia’s eastern communal conservancies”, was recently published in the journal Human Dimensions of Wildlife, and is authored by Stijn Verschueren, Willem D. Briers-Louw, Carolina Torres-Uribe, Annetjie Siyaya and Laurie Marker of CCF.
Livestock depredation causes severe economic costs for farmers across Africa, which motivates retaliatory killings of predators, which is why CCF’s teams conduct research and work closely with farmers to reduce carnivore conflict.
The new study also determined that variability in livestock losses is high between farmers, with some farmers losing up to 50 head of stock or more, while others did not lose livestock at all. This information helps identify areas where CCF and other organisations should prioritize mitigation efforts, because the territory being studied is an extremely large area.

Other predators
CCF researchers also found that the canids in this area, i.e. the African wild dog and the black-backed jackal, are responsible for the majority of reported livestock attacks. Jackals are opportunistic hunters and often prey upon small stock, while African wild dogs prefer cattle when wild prey is scarce.
In addition to research activities concerning the biology and conservation of cheetahs, CCF’s team is putting considerable effort into understanding and protecting African wild dogs in the eastern communal conservancies, as they have long been understudied and heavily persecuted.
“CCF’s approach in this area targets both the wellbeing of local people and the survival of predators in this ecosystem. We have been organising conservation-based workshops with a focus on rangeland management, livestock husbandry and the value of carnivores within the ecosystem. Preliminary results show that these workshops are very effective in reducing conflict,” said Dr Laurie Marker, CCF Founder and Executive Director.
“Furthermore, we operate a permanent hotline (+264 81 227 5139) to quickly respond to conflict situations and we offer free veterinary services for domestic and livestock animals when in the villages. Recently, we also completed a biodiversity survey to estimate abundance and distribution of carnivores and other wildlife in the area. Additional research will inform us how habitat characteristics and human activities shape their distributions, which will be important for future restoration efforts.”

Similar News

 

International accolade for EIF

4 days ago - 16 September 2020 | Environment

The Environmental Investment Fund of Namibia (EIF) received a certificate of merit for outstanding Sustainable Project Financing at the Karlsruhe Sustainable Finance Awards, recognising its...

Ozone for life!

4 days ago - 16 September 2020 | Environment

Namibia, along with the rest of the world, celebrates 35 years of the Vienna Convention and 35 years of global ozone layer protection today.In a...

Opportunities for encroacher bush

1 week ago - 07 September 2020 | Environment

Windhoek • Erastus Ngaruka & Arnoldt //GasebBush encroachment can be defined as dominant increase in density of woody plant species on a piece of land....

International support for San

1 week ago - 07 September 2020 | Environment

The impact of Covid-19 on Namibia’s economy is considerable. However, the impact on many poor rural communities, in particular communal conservancies, could be even greater...

Don’t dump oil in City sewers

3 weeks ago - 27 August 2020 | Environment

The City of Windhoek (CoW) said that it has noticed an increase in the unsafe disposal of used motor oil, mainly due to increased backyard...

Fluit, fluit – Namibiese dolfyne laat van hulle hoor

3 weeks ago - 27 August 2020 | Environment

'n Internasionale span wetenskaplikes het daarin geslaag om met behulp van die eiesoortige fluitgeluide van bottelneusdolfyne, die grootte van hul bevolking te bepaal én hul...

Keeping fire at bay

3 weeks ago - 25 August 2020 | Environment

It has been a devastating year for conservancies that are largely dependent on tourism and trophy hunting for an income. Global travel bans and quarantine...

Robbe soog kalfies tot volwassenheid

1 month - 13 August 2020 | Environment

Sommige Kaapse pelsrob-ma’s kan hulle kalfies vir veel langer soog as wat voorheen aanvaar is, en daardeur waarskynlik hul afstammeling se kans op oorlewing vergroot....

Quick work saves pangolin

1 month - 05 August 2020 | Environment

During a first of its kind cooperation between US Law Enforcement and the Namibian Police (Nampol), four suspected pangolin traffickers were arrested in Namibia on...

Windhoek game park under threat

1 month - 22 July 2020 | Environment

The Daan Viljoen game park is under constant threat from communities living in the informal settlements of Windhoek who enter the park illegally for poaching.Daan...

Latest News

Qatar also heading back to...

3 days ago - 17 September 2020 | Transport

Come 15 October, Qatar Airways will be flying to Windhoek three times a week again.The announcement came earlier today, and follows the decision by Eurowings...

Sen Pang leads UN Namibia

3 days ago - 17 September 2020 | People

Sen Pang, the newly appointed United Nations Resident Coordinator in Namibia, was received at State House, where he handed over his Letter of Credence and...

Informal market coming for Havana

3 days ago - 17 September 2020 | Infrastructure

Windhoek mayor Fransina Kahungu said the city received a pledge of N$5 million from the ministry of industrialisation, trade and SME development to help build...

Eurowings makes a Namibian return

3 days ago - 17 September 2020 | Transport

Eurowings will resume their Frankfurt-Windhoek route this weekend, with the first flight landing at the Hosea Kutako International Airport (HKIA) on Sunday.In a media statement,...

Another Air Namibia resignation

3 days ago - 17 September 2020 | Business

The national airline’s chief financial officer Werner Schuckmann has tendered his resignation with effect 30 September 2020.The process to recruit a substantive chief financial officer...

Card fraud on the increase

3 days ago - 17 September 2020 | Opinion

Windhoek • Riaan ViljoenDuring the lockdown, a whole new generation of users discovered the joys and convenience of online shopping.Worldwide, online debit or credit card...

Masking Namibia

3 days ago - 17 September 2020 | Social Issues

Local social impact agency, Arba Stature, in partnership with Namibia Breweries Limited (NBL) donated 2253 face masks to 25 schools through its #CoverNamibia campaign.Designed to...

GIPF says investments safe

3 days ago - 17 September 2020 | Economics

The Government Institutions Pension Fund (GIPF) said that it is aware of the de-registration of the Baobab Capital (Pty) Ltd (the fund manager) and Baobab...

International accolade for EIF

4 days ago - 16 September 2020 | Environment

The Environmental Investment Fund of Namibia (EIF) received a certificate of merit for outstanding Sustainable Project Financing at the Karlsruhe Sustainable Finance Awards, recognising its...

Load More